Area Info

Hot Springs, Arkansas
"America's first Resort"

Hot Springs is traditionally best known for the natural spring water that gives it its name, flowing out of the ground at a temperature of 147 °F (64 °C). Hot Springs National Park is the oldest federal reserve in the USA, and the tourist trade brought by the famous springs make it a very successful spa town. It is famous for being the childhood home of President of the United States Bill Clinton. As Hot Springs National Park was the oldest federal reserve, it was the first to receive its own US quarter in April 2010 as part of the America the Beautiful Quarters.

The city takes its name from the natural thermal water that flows from 47 springs on the western slope of Hot Springs Mountain in the historic downtown district of the city. About a million gallons of 143-degree[clarification needed] water flow from the springs each day. The rate of flow is not affected by fluctuations in the rainfall in the area. Studies by National Park Service scientists have determined through carbon dating[clarification needed] that the water that reaches the surface in Hot Springs fell as rainfall in an as-yet undetermined watershed 4,000 years earlier. The water percolates very slowly down through the earth's surface until it reaches superheated areas deep in the crust and then rushes rapidly to the surface to emerge from the 47 hot springs.
A small channel of hot spring water known as Hot Springs Creek runs under ground from an area near Park Avenue to Bath House Row.

The Quapaw Bathhouse
The Quapaw Bathhouse, along Hot Springs' famed "Bathhouse Row"
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Ouachita Mountains (wosh-i-taw)are a mountain range in west central Arkansas and southeastern Oklahoma.
The highest peak in the Ouachitas is Mount Magazine in west-central Arkansas which rises to 2,753 feet (839 m).
The Ouachita Mountains are fold mountains like the Appalachian Mountains to the east, and were originally part of that range.. At one time the Ouachita Mountains were very similar in height to the current elevations of the Rocky Mountains. Because of the Ouachitas' age, the craggy tops have eroded away, leaving the low formations that used to be the heart of the mountains.
Unlike most other mountain ranges in the United States, the Ouachitas run east and west rather than north and south.